• Amisfield Walled Garden

    On the outskirts of Haddington, Amisfield Walled Garden dates from the late 18th century. It is one of the largest walled gardens in Scotland with extensive herbaceous borders, fruit and vegetable beds, wildflower meadow, orchard and woodland plantings.  Amisfield is a community garden managed by the Amisfield Preservation Trust and a large band of volunteers. […]

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  • Butterdean Wood

    Managed by the Woodland Trust, Butterdean Wood lies a couple of miles from Haddington, near the hamlet of Gladsmuir. There are two waymarked paths (which can sometimes be muddy), which make for ideal walks through the woods. Roe deer graze in the woods and there’s a rich selection of flora and fauna, with the birdlife […]

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  • Hailes Castle

    In a beautiful location on the banks of the River Tyne just 5 miles from Haddington, Hailes Castle dates from the early 1200s and is one of Scotland’s oldest stone castles. Built by the de Gourlay family, Hailes was frequently besieged. It withstood an attack in 1400 by Henry Hotspur Percy but fell to various […]

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  • Lennoxlove House

    One mile south of Haddington, Lennoxlove House is a historic building described by Historic Scotland as “one of Scotland’s most ancient and notable houses”. Standing in the middle of an extensive estate, it comprises a 15th-century tower, originally known as Lethington Tower, which has been extended several times to create a stately home now containing the Dukes […]

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  • National Flag Heritage Centre

    The St Andrew’s Cross or Saltire is Scotland’s national flag and one of the oldest in the world. Its origins reputedly come from a battle fought close to Athelstaneford in 832 AD. The National Flag Centre occupies a doocot, located to the north of the church. Within the doocot, visitors can enjoy a short audio-visual […]

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  • National Museum of Flight

    Discover the stories behind one of Europe’s best collections of aircraft and find out more about the people who flew and worked with them through dramatic displays and fascinating interviews. Find out how developments in civil aviation have helped to connect communities, allowing people to travel short distances more easily and opened up opportunities to […]

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  • Nungate Bridge

    One of Scotland’s oldest bridges, the bridge dates from the 16th century, although a bridge has stood on this site since at least 1282. The 30m bridge was once a main route into the town and was used by numerous invading armies. It was severely damaged during the Siege of Haddington in 1548 and it […]

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  • St Mary’s Kirk

    The longest parish church in Scotland and successor to the title of the Lamp of Lothian, St Mary’s Kirk is in a beautiful setting by the river Tyne. Building of the church first began in 1375 but took more than 100 years. St Mary’s was largely ruined by Henry VIII’s forces during the 1548-49 Siege […]

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  • St Mary’s Pleasance

    St Mary’s Pleasance is maintained for the public by Haddington Garden Trust, a charity that relies on grants, donations and gifts to maintain and develop the garden. The garden occupies 1.6 acres between St Mary’s Churchyard, Lady Kitty’s Garden and Haddington House, which dates from 1648 and is the oldest dwelling in Haddington. Some of […]

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  • The John Gray Centre

    The John Gray Centre in Lodge Street is a major visitor attraction which brings together an East Lothian museum as well as the town’s library, local history centre and archives. Housed in what was previously four historic buildings, the centre is a bright, welcoming resource which aims to inspire the people of East Lothian to […]

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  • Town House

    This elegant building dates from 1748 to an original design by Scottish architect William Adam.  A court-room and assembly room – with pilastered and pedimented gable with a Venetian window – were added to the west side of Adam’s Town House in 1788, over the colonnaded Haddington market. The Town House steeple was replaced in […]

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  • Traprain Law

    One of East Lothian’s most distinctive features, Traprain Law – approximately four miles from Haddington – rises to 724 feet (221 metres), with the summit providing spectacular views. There are signs of burials from around 1500BC and occupation after 1000BC, and it appears to have been occupied in the Late Iron Age by the Votadini […]

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